Two Emails for MOC Control – the Battle Continues!

TWO emails to get real MOC control in Florida  – thanks for being a warrior in the battle for your profession!

One to House to pass HB 723 and One to Senate to Repair SB 1354. Just click EACH "email" link below. (If link does not open up YOUR email program to automatically create an email to the representative and Senators, go to bottom for further instructions.)

Click here to email Florida House HHS Committee to Stop MOC by voting yes on HB 723

Please paste in the following letter to the Body to send to the House.

Click here to email Florida Senate to ask for a REPAIR of SB 1354 for REAL MOC Control.  

Please paste in the following letter to the Body to send to the Senate

If you are wondering why there are two different bills, one good (House) and one bad (Senate), please go here to learn how the FMA gutted the original SB 1354 MOC control and replaced it with something that will make MOC even worse!
(note a blind cc is sent to President of of Florida AAPS, Dr. McKalip to guage success of our campaign).

Dear Representative,

I am a practicing physician in Florida. I am writing to urge you to vote in favor of Florida House Bill 723. This bill provides reasonable control to the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) programs that are causing patients to lose their doctors in Florida. The bill would prohibit mandatory MOC for doctors to practice in hospitals, participate in insurance plans and to receive their medical license.  

We urge you to vote against any attempt to remove these protections in the amendment process and to avoid granting power to the executive branch to determine what qualifies as a board certifying entity. Adding more power to state agencies, such as the DOH, will unnecessarily expand bureaucracy, allow politics to determine who the state “approves” for board certification and would likely make matters worse by imposing more MOC requirements onto doctors that the state does not currently require.

The wealthy Board certification corporations are making tens of millions on needless testing to “re-certify” doctors that used to be certified for life. I have no problem doing the 40 hours of regular CME as required by Florida law, but hospitals and insurance companies should not require doctors to do the onerous MOC tasks simply to help large private boards make money. The state should not require MOC for my license. More importantly, the data is quite clear that MOC does NOTHING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE. See this JAMA article that shows that those with life-time Certification were just as good as those who re-certified with MOC. MOC is decreasing access to patient care by narrowing the networks of insurance companies that require it and decreasing the pool of doctors who can practice in hospitals. Please go back to the original language and repair the damage done in the Health Policy Committee that reversed the intent of the original MOC control bill.

Please vote for the current version of HB723 referred from the House Quality Committee and do not remove the important language it contains nor add any more power to the Executive branch to “approve” a board certifying entity in the state.

 

Respectfully,

Dear Senator,

As a Florida physician, I am asking your Banking and Insurance Committee to return to the original language of SB 1354 to place reasonable Controls on Maintenance of Certification (MOC). The Health Policy Committee erred in substituting the entire original bill with language that expands state bureaucracy and actually expands the burden of Maintenance of Certification on doctors – moving in the opposite direction of the original bill.

I ask that you support a substitute amendment of the current Committee Substitute to replace the original language of SB 1354 that prohibits use of MOC when deciding what doctors may practice in hospitals, may be paid by insurance companies and may receive a license in the state of Florida.

The wealthy Board certification corporations are making tens of millions on needless testing to “re-certify” doctors that used to be certified for life. I have no problem doing the 40 hours of regular CME as required by Florida law, but hospitals and insurance companies should not require doctors to do the onerous MOC tasks simply to help large private boards make money. The state should not require MOC for my license. More importantly, the data is quite clear that MOC does NOTHING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE. See this JAMA article that shows that those with life-time Certification were just as good as those who re-certified with MOC. MOC is decreasing access to patient care by narrowing the networks of insurance companies that require it and decreasing the pool of doctors who can practice in hospitals. Please go back to the original language and repair the damage done in the Health Policy Committee that reversed the intent of the original MOC control bill.

Respectfully,

 

 

(if link does not open up YOUR email program to automatically create an email, follow the three steps below.)

 

HOUSE

1. Paste these emails in the “to” line of an email.

 

Travis.Cummings@myfloridahouse.gov; David.Santiago@myfloridahouse.gov; Bobby.DuBose@myfloridahouse.gov; Thad.Altman@myfloridahouse.gov; Daisy.Baez@myfloridahouse.gov; Lori.Berman@myfloridahouse.gov; Jason.Brodeur@myfloridahouse.gov; Michael.Grant@myfloridahouse.gov; Roy.Hardemon@myfloridahouse.gov;  dmckalip@neuro3.net;  Gayle.Harrell@myfloridahouse.gov; MaryLynn.Magar@myfloridahouse.gov; Ralph.Massullo@myfloridahouse.gov; Alex.miller@myfloridahouse.gov; Cary.Pigman@myfloridahouse.gov; Paul.Renner@myfloridahouse.gov; David.Silvers@myfloridahouse.gov; frank.white@myfloridahouse.gov; Pat.Williams@myfloridahouse.gov

 

 

2.     Place Subject – “   Vote Yes on HB 723 (MOC)  ”.

3.     Compose an email explaining why –OR- Paste this into an email body (supplement with your own details if you can).

Dear Representative,

I am a practicing physician in Florida. I am writing to urge you to vote in favor of Florida House Bill 723. This bill provides reasonable control to the Maintenance of Certification (MOC) programs that are causing patients to lose their doctors in Florida. The bill would prohibit mandatory MOC for doctors to practice in hospitals, participate in insurance plans and to receive their medical license.  

We urge you to vote against any attempt to remove these protections in the amendment process and to avoid granting power to the executive branch to determine what qualifies as a board certifying entity. Adding more power to state agencies, such as the DOH, will unnecessarily expand bureaucracy, allow politics to determine who the state “approves” for board certification and would likely make matters worse by imposing more MOC requirements onto doctors that the state does not currently require.

The wealthy Board certification corporations are making tens of millions on needless testing to “re-certify” doctors that used to be certified for life. I have no problem doing the 40 hours of regular CME as required by Florida law, but hospitals and insurance companies should not require doctors to do the onerous MOC tasks simply to help large private boards make money. The state should not require MOC for my license. More importantly, the data is quite clear that MOC does NOTHING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE. See this JAMA article that shows that those with life-time Certification were just as good as those who re-certified with MOC. MOC is decreasing access to patient care by narrowing the networks of insurance companies that require it and decreasing the pool of doctors who can practice in hospitals. Please go back to the original language and repair the damage done in the Health Policy Committee that reversed the intent of the original MOC control bill.

Please vote for the current version of HB723 referred from the House Quality Committee and do not remove the important language it contains nor add any more power to the Executive branch to “approve” a board certifying entity in the state.

 

Respectfully,

Senate

1. Paste these emails in the “to” line of an email.

 

Flores.Anitere@flsenate.gov; Thurston.Perry@flsenate.gov; Mayfield.Debbie@flsenate.gov; Steube.Greg@flsenate.gov; dmckalip@neuro3.net; Bracy.Randolph@flsenate.gov; Braynon.Oscar@flsenate.gov; Farmer.Gary@flsenate.gov; Gainer.George@flsenate.gov; Garcia.Rene@flsenate.gov

 

2.     Place Subject – “   REPAIR MOC Bill (SB 1354)  ”.

3.     Compose an email explaining why –OR- Paste this into an email body (supplement with your own details if you can).

Dear Senator,

As a Florida physician, I am asking your Banking and Insurance Committee to return to the original language of SB 1354 to place reasonable Controls on Maintenance of Certification (MOC). The Health Policy Committee erred in substituting the entire original bill with language that expands state bureaucracy and actually expands the burden of Maintenance of Certification on doctors – moving in the opposite direction of the original bill.

I ask that you support a substitute amendment of the current Committee Substitute to replace the original language of SB 1354 that prohibits use of MOC when deciding what doctors may practice in hospitals, may be paid by insurance companies and may receive a license in the state of Florida.

The wealthy Board certification corporations are making tens of millions on needless testing to “re-certify” doctors that used to be certified for life. I have no problem doing the 40 hours of regular CME as required by Florida law, but hospitals and insurance companies should not require doctors to do the onerous MOC tasks simply to help large private boards make money. The state should not require MOC for my license. More importantly, the data is quite clear that MOC does NOTHING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE. See this JAMA article that shows that those with life-time Certification were just as good as those who re-certified with MOC. MOC is decreasing access to patient care by narrowing the networks of insurance companies that require it and decreasing the pool of doctors who can practice in hospitals. Please go back to the original language and repair the damage done in the Health Policy Committee that reversed the intent of the original MOC control bill.

Respectfully,